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By Lisa Levenstein

During this daring interpretation of U.S. historical past, Lisa Levenstein reframes hugely charged debates over the origins of power African American poverty and the social regulations and political struggles that resulted in the postwar city main issue. A circulation with out Marches follows bad black ladies as they traveled from a few of Philadelphia's so much impoverished neighborhoods into its welfare workplaces, courtrooms, public housing, faculties, and hospitals, laying declare to an exceptional array of presidency merits and prone. Levenstein uncovers the limitations that led girls to public associations, emphasizing the significance not just of deindustrialization and racial discrimination but additionally of women's studies with intercourse discrimination, insufficient public schooling, baby rearing, family violence, and persistent disorder. Women's claims on public associations introduced a number new assets into negative African American groups. With those assets got here new constraints, as public officers often replied to women's efforts via restricting merits and trying to regulate their own lives. Scathing public narratives approximately women's "dependency" and their kid's "illegitimacy" positioned African American ladies and public associations on the middle of the transforming into competition to black migration and civil rights in northern U.S. towns. Countering stereotypes that experience lengthy plagued public debate, A stream with no Marches bargains a brand new paradigm for knowing postwar U.S. historical past.

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Additional resources for A Movement Without Marches: African American Women and the Politics of Poverty in Postwar Philadelphia (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture)

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Morris explained that her husband had defaulted on several child support payments and she was sinking into debt. ’’ Mrs. 00 food bill demonstrated remarkable thrift. However, he told her that he could not provide her with supplementary income until the ‘‘halfway mark’’ of the month. With not a penny to her name and her debts piling up, Mrs. Morris had exhausted all options and had nowhere else to turn for assistance. ‘‘When people say ‘Oh, you’re on relief’ [welfare], they think the average person that’s on relief is sitting down with nothing to do,’’ she told researchers in the early 1960s.

Neighbors sat on their steps, and children were disciplined collectively by mothers who punished anyone they caught misbehaving on their blocks. Mrs. Elkins lived in a ‘‘wreck’’ of a building in the area of West Philadelphia that African Americans called ‘‘the bottom’’ because of its location below 52nd Street. ‘‘The bottom,’’ Mrs. Elkins explained, accurately described the physical condition of the neighborhood. ≤≠ However, in the postwar period, African Americans lived in increasingly racially segregated neighborhoods and began to predominate among those who lived in dilapidated and crowded conditions.

She did not own a phone because the welfare department considered it a ‘‘luxury,’’ and she could not a√ord to buy one anyway. When Mrs. ’’ Mrs. Morris explained that her husband had defaulted on several child support payments and she was sinking into debt. ’’ Mrs. 00 food bill demonstrated remarkable thrift. However, he told her that he could not provide her with supplementary income until the ‘‘halfway mark’’ of the month. With not a penny to her name and her debts piling up, Mrs. Morris had exhausted all options and had nowhere else to turn for assistance.

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